February 11th, 2019: So What *Does* Vision Zero Look Like?

Enjoy your last dry commute before the "wintry mix" is upon us:

Monday Weather

Monday Mostly cloudy, with a high near 39. Wind chill values between 25 and 35. Northeast wind 3 to 7 mph.

Monday Night A 40 percent chance of snow after midnight. Cloudy, with a low around 28. Wind chill values between 20 and 25. East wind 7 to 11 mph.

Sunrise: 6:55am

Sunset: 5:26pm

Our elected officials continue to ask questions after the NYPD's actions on 9th Avenue this past Thursday:

It's inspiring to see them taking notice:

Though it also raises a whole new set of questions:

This isn't what Vision Zero looks like either:

“Cars need to be able to stop and get their coffee,” Brewer said. “Columbus and Amsterdam [avenues with protected bike lanes] have more space. You don’t have double-parking like you do on Dyckman. The culture is double parking! You’re not going to change that.”

Meanwhile, in Brooklyn, the 94th Precinct was confiscating ebikes:

Maybe they don't want to jeopardize their relationship with the Baskin Robbins.

In happier news, it's good to see an editorial in the mainstream media advocating for the Dutch Reach:

What’s a dooring? That’s the technical term for what happens when a car door crosses a cyclist’s path — when a small, lightweight, fast-moving object comes into contact with a larger, heavier, stationary entity. The effects can be devastating.

Now for the solution. Remarkably, there is an unheralded, low-cost approach to reducing this sort of accident. It’s called the “Dutch Reach” — for the bike-happy country where it is widely practiced — and it is as simple as its two-syllable name.

Though this was a bit puzzling:

Helmets, lights, barriers to separate bikes and cars — all these reduce cycling accidents. One small behavioral change should be added to the list — one that asks little of drivers and costs nothing. Give the Dutch Reach a place on American roads.

I don't think even the most staunch helmet apologist would claim a helmet actually prevents an "accident"--Volvo vaporware notwithstanding, of course:

Beyond the city limits, with the new Tappan Zee Mario Cuomo Bridge bicycle and pedestrian path to open...eventually, the towns on either end of it appear to be locked in a competition to prove how bike-unfriendly they are.  Over in South Nyack of course they've been arguing that the path should be closed at night:

"I think it's a safety issue," Christian said of the path's operating hours. "We don't need people out there in late in the early morning hours. Nothing good happens in the early morning hours."

South Nyackians are not morning people apparently.

And now, over in Sleepy Hollow,  they want to lock you up for parking your bike on the sidewalk or something:

That should be fantastic for business.

Finally, sometimes you only get one shot at fame, so make the best of it:

Expect the NYPD to track him down and ticket him for bicycling one-handed.