Hometransalt.org
Bicycle Blueprint
Introduction

NYC Cycling
NYC Bike Policy
2. State of NYC Cycling
3. Cyclists & Streets
A Bike and a Prayer


Riding Infrastructure
4. Street Design
5. Bridges
6. Road Surfaces
7. Greenways
8. Parks
9. Bicycles and Transit
10. Reducing Traffic


Security
11. Bicycle Theft
12. On-Street Parking
13. Indoor Parking


On the Job Cycling
14. Bicycle Messengers
Fifth, Park & Madison
15. Freight Cycles
16. Gov't Cycling


Reducing Risks
17. Accidents
Three Who Died
18. Air Pollution


Bicycle Education
19. Schools
20. Public Education


Appendices

      Chapter 1:
Integrating NYC's Bicycle Policy
 How to Read the Blueprint
b) The Importance of Integrated Bicycle Planning
c) The Practice of Integrated Bicycle Planning
d) Bicycle Planning in North America
e) Bicycle Planning in New York City
f) The New Transportation Planning Environment
g) The Benefit-Cost Advantage of Bicycling for New York City
h) Chapter 1 Recommendations

How to Read the Blueprint

Each of the following chapters treats a different facet of bicycling experience in New York City. Though the emphasis varies according to topic, all chapters include (i) analysis of current policies — or lack thereof — which help shape current cycling conditions, and (ii) recommendations for change to improve bicycling conditions and further the social goals of personal mobility, fiscal savings, clean air and safer, more convivial streets.

Each topic is accompanied by a set of specific policy recommendations. These are printed in two different forms in the Blueprint: first, at the end of the chapter to which they apply; and second, listed together in Appendix A, organized according to the specific governmental agency or private sector to which they apply. Some recommendations can be implemented immediately by administrators and legislators for little or no cost; others require capital investment and some degree of departure from the transportation establishment's current thinking.

Some sections are aimed at specific city, state or other agencies, while others are more general in nature. Many of the proposed changes fall under the jurisdiction of the New York City Department of Transportation (DoT), but Chapter 9: Bicycles and Transit is addressed primarily to the area's transit operators, regional planners, and suburban authorities, while Chapter 13: Indoor Parking speaks to commercial landlords and the City's Department of General Services, and so on. We hope that agency personnel and legislators with interests in particular aspects of bicycling or transportation policy and its far-reaching consequences for the shape of our city will focus on those sections addressed to them, and take the steps we advocate to heart.




 How to Read the Blueprint
b) The Importance of Integrated Bicycle Planning
c) The Practice of Integrated Bicycle Planning
d) Bicycle Planning in North America
e) Bicycle Planning in New York City
f) The New Transportation Planning Environment
g) The Benefit-Cost Advantage of Bicycling for New York City
h) Chapter 1 Recommendations

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