Hometransalt.org
Bicycle Blueprint
Introduction

NYC Cycling
1. NYC Bike Policy
2. State of NYC Cycling
3. Cyclists & Streets
A Bike and a Prayer


Riding Infrastructure
4. Street Design
5. Bridges
6. Road Surfaces
7. Greenways
8. Parks
Bicycles and Transit
10. Reducing Traffic


Security
11. Bicycle Theft
12. On-Street Parking
13. Indoor Parking


On the Job Cycling
14. Bicycle Messengers
Fifth, Park & Madison
15. Freight Cycles
16. Gov't Cycling


Reducing Risks
17. Accidents
Three Who Died
18. Air Pollution


Bicycle Education
19. Schools
20. Public Education


Appendices

      Chapter 9:
Bicycles and Transit
 Bicycles and Mass Transit
b) Rail-Station Bicycle Parking
c) Europe and Japan
d) United States and New York
e) Bicycle Parking Costs
f) Station Parking Conditions in the New York Area
g) Ride-and-Bike
h) Bicycles on Transit Vehicles
i) New York City Transit Authority
j) Bus Access
k) Ferries
l) Chapter 9 Recommendations

David Perry
Bike-bus shuttle used by NYC DoT during interruptions in bridge access.
Photo: David Perry


Futuristic Pedal Train by Steven Johnson.
See larger view.


Logo for Long Island Rail Road's Cyc-n-Ride permit.

Bicycles and Mass Transit

Read the latest news on this subject.

Bicycling and mass transit are both antidotes to the congestion and pollution caused by automobile use. But for many travelers, neither form of transport alone can compete with the auto's combination of range, flexibility and convenience. However, if bikes and transit work as a team, they make a formidable alternative to the car — just as flexible and convenient; cheaper, more relaxing and often faster; and without the automobile's environmental damage.

Transportation Alternatives' 1992 City Cyclist survey found strong support for improving bicycle-transit links. Access to subways was deemed “very important” by 56% of respondents and “somewhat important” by 31%; only 8% considered it unimportant (the remaining 5% of respondents did not express an opinion). Linkage to commuter rail lines also scored high; access to Metro-North trains was considered very important or somewhat important by 69%, the same score registered for access to the Long Island Rail Road. Only one-fifth of respondents rated access to either line as unimportant.

Although some of the region's transit providers provide a modicum of bicycle parking facilities and on-board access, these provisions are limited and remain largely unknown except to hard-core cyclists. A comprehensive system of bike-transit links, based on best current practice in the U.S. and overseas, and even in the New York region, could cost-effectively displace a significant percentage of car trips. This will require far more interjurisdictional and interagency cooperation than is evident today. [1]

NOTES:
1. Michael Replogle and Harriet Parcells, Linking Bicycle/Pedestrian Facilities with Transit, prepared for U.S. Federal Highway Administration, Sept. 1992, p. 31.


 Bicycles and Mass Transit
b) Rail-Station Bicycle Parking
c) Europe and Japan
d) United States and New York
e) Bicycle Parking Costs
f) Station Parking Conditions in the New York Area
g) Ride-and-Bike
h) Bicycles on Transit Vehicles
i) New York City Transit Authority
j) Bus Access
k) Ferries
l) Chapter 9 Recommendations

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