FIBORO BRIDGES

Contact Information and Links



Okay, so that hole in the pedestrian path of your favorite bridge has tripped you up one too many times. Or you’re wondering when they’re ever going to be finished with construction on, say, the Manhattan Bridge. Or you’ve decided to join the campaign for access to the Verrazano Bridge. So who do you call? Or maybe you're writing a book report for school about bridges. Maybe the links below can help you.

Transportation Alternatives is a NYC nonprofit advocate for walkers and bicyclists. Phone 212-629-8080, or email info@transalt.org.
Also check out our main page of government contact information.
New York City DOT
The New York City Department of Transportation’s Bureau of Bridges oversees the operation of the smaller bridges in the city, from the Queensboro Bridge on down. The main contact number is (212 or 718)-CALL-DOT and the Bureau of Bridges can be reached at 212-788-1951. For bicycling-related issues, you can email the DOT’s Bicycle Program Coordinator, John Benfatti, at jbenfatt@dot1lan.nycnet.ci.nyc.ny.us , or call him at 212-442-9890.
Metropolitan Transportation Authority
The Metropolitan Transportation Authority owns and operates seven of the area’s larger bridges, including the Verrazano Bridge and the Triboro Bridge. They can be reached by phone at 212-474-8966.
The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey owns and operates the George Washington Bridge and the three bridges connecting Staten Island with New Jersey. For bridge information, contact Connie Dellabarca at 212-435-4794. Call (800) 221-9903 for recorded information regarding tunnels and bridges, but it isn’t very helpful for non-motorists. It is staffed 10:00-16:00 weekdays only. A feedback box is available at the Port’s website.
Steve Anderson’s Crossings of Metro New York contains lots of detailed info.
The Bridges Project, Rice University Dept of Civil Engineering
A database of bridges worldwide, with data, photos, history, and comparative features like custom timelines, graphs, and elevation comparisons. Includes New York City bridges as well as some other East Coast bridges.
 

Other sites with bridge information and photos include www.newyorkled.com, www.davefrieder.com, and Jih's Bridge and Tunnels page.