November/December 1995, p.5

Bike Shorts

Northern Manhattan Bike Lane Set For Spring '96
After a record number of Community Board meetings (we lost track after 15), the St. Nicholas Avenue bike lane has been approved by Community Boards 9,10, and 12 and will be on the ground in the spring. Thanks go to the many T.A. volunteers who showed their support, DOT Commissioner Elliot Sander, and DOT Manhattan Borough Commissioner Ruben Ramirez.

Read the latest news about this issue.


DOT Prospect Park Study Floundering
The DOT's car-free Prospect Park study has slowed to a crawl following the departure of the project manager for another city agency. The final results of that study (to determine the feasibility of a car-free park) were due out in October.
Brooklynites must make their voices heard on this issue. If you want a car-free Prospect Park, write to: Borough President Howard Golden, 209 Joralemon St. Brooklyn, NY 11201.

Read the latest news about this issue.


T.A. Asks LIRR for Better Bike Access
Transportation Alternatives has asked Long Island Rail Road officials to improve bicycle access by installing special wheelchair/bicycle storage areas on its new double-decker coaches. Caltrans, the San Francisco Bay Area commuter rail, has in place a very successful bike access system, are which the LIRR would do well to copy.

Read the latest news about this issue.


Hudson Street: Let's Get It Done!
City traffic planners continue to tinker with different designs for the Hudson Street/8th Avenue bike lane. When completed, the lane will stretch from Canal Street to Columbus Circle along Hudson Street and 8th Avenue. West Side residents should write to the DOT and ask that the project be speeded along.
Write to: Glynis Berry, Bicycle and Pedestrian Planning, 40 Worth St., NYC, 10013.

Read the latest news about this issue.


Bike Lanes Vs. Road Widening in New Jersey
Randolph, NJ (Morris County) township leaders are working to lay down a network of bike lanes, starting this month with a 2-mile stretch on Calais Road. While the state Department of Transportation plans to widen the main county road from two lanes to four, the township has countered with a proposal for bike lanes, crosswalks, and sidewalks along the 4.2 mile stretch of Sussex Turnpike.
In a recent Newark Star-Ledger article, Randolph Township Councilmember Jon Huston lamented the town's dependence on automobiles. Huston hopes a network of bike routes would connect the town, saying "you don't always have to jump in the car to get where you're going."

Read the latest news about this issue.